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Table 2 Physiological correlates of stress and stress-induced anhedonia in our model

From: Update in the methodology of the chronic stress paradigm: internal control matters

Physiological variable Anhedonic Changes vs. control Non-anhedonic Changes vs. control Reference
1. Floating in forced swim test Increased Not changed [38, 44, 45]
2. Immobilization in tailsuspension test Increased Not changed [39, 47]
3. Novelty exploration Decreased Not changed [44]
4. Burrowing behaviour Decreased Increased [38, 39]
5. Contextual memory in passive avoidance Decreased Not changed [38]
6. Contextual fear conditioning Decreased Not changed [Tokarski et al. Impaired hippocampal plasticity in mice with hedonic deficit, induced by chronic stress (unpublished)]
7. LTP in the CA1 area of the hippocampus Disrupted Not changed [Tokarski et al. Impaired hippocampal plasticity in mice with hedonic deficit, induced by chronic stress (unpublished)]
8. REM sleep Increased Not changed [46, 48]
9. Home cage activity during dark phase Increased Not changed [47]
10. Anxiety-like behavior in O-maze and dark-light box Increased Increased [38, 44, 108]
11. Open field locomotion under modest lighting Increased Increased [38, 44, 108]
12. Aggressive behavior Increased Increased [[95], unpublished data]
13. Auditory fear conditioning Not changed Not changed [Tokarski et al. Impaired hippocampal plasticity in mice with hedonic deficit, induced by chronic stress (unpublished]
14. Body weight Decreased Decreased [38, 39, 4449]
  1. Eight out of fourteen evaluated physiological variables had differential changes in anhedonic and non-anhedonic animals, as compared to control. Remaining parameters were either not altered in these groups, or were changed in the same direction, suggesting that not all physiological consequences of stress can be attributed to anhedonia in the employed model.